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Tips for Going to Therapy for the First Time

If you’re going to therapy for the first time you probably have a lot of questions about how to prepare and what to expect.

Going to therapy can be awkward at first and I still feel weird going to talk to a therapist I don’t know.

However, there are a lot of benefits to therapy.

If you’re struggling with your mental health I encourage you to go despite feeling awkward.

If it helps you feel better it will be worth those uncomfortable feelings in the beginning.

My therapists have helped me through a number of difficult situations and taught me coping skills I use every day.

I can honestly say going to therapy can make a huge difference in your life and if you’re living with depression or struggling with anxiety you should definitely give it a shot.

Here are some tips for going to therapy for the first time.

Finding a Therapist

Your relationship with your therapist is unique. It might take a few times to find the right person for you.

You wouldn’t quit dating if you didn’t find a long-term partner on your first date.

Finding a therapist can be like that.

You have to go to different therapists to figure out what you like and what works for you.

When I’m really depressed I don’t like to talk to anyone face to face and I use Better Help.

This program lets you text, call or skype with a therapist.

I also like that I can text my therapist as many times throughout the day as I want and it’s still cheaper than one face to face therapy session per week.

Try searching online with Psychology Todays Therapist Finder.

When you’re looking for a therapist do some research about different methods. Some of the basic frameworks include:

Behavior therapy This approach focuses on normal and abnormal behaviors

Cognitive therapy Cognitive therapy emphasizes normal and abnormal thoughts

Humanistic therapy Is an approach is based on concern and respect for others

You can read more about theoretical approaches in this article.

Think about what you want to work on before you begin therapy.

Going to a therapist is a significant investment of your time and money. You want to have a clear idea of what will make it worth it to you.

going to therapy for the first time

 

It Takes Time

I’ve heard people say therapy wasn’t for them after they only went to one session.

There’s absolutely no way to know if therapy is for you after one session.

It can take a long time to build a relationship with a therapist in order to do the deep work you might need to do to heal.

Your relationship with your therapist is like every other relationship in your life and it’s not built overnight.

If you’re going to go to therapy you need to commit to giving it a fair shot (I would say six months).

It’s hard to be patient when you’re struggling with mental illness because it can make life so uncomfortable but healing is going to take time.

You need to make the commitment to yourself to see it through and give yourself the chance to get better.

Don’t Worry

Yes, talking to a stranger can be awkward. However, your therapist is a professional.

They aren’t judging you or your problems, they are there because they want to help you.

Don’t let fear stop you from doing something good for yourself.

If you’re feeling scared or nervous, keep in mind why you want to go.

If you’re seeking help with anxiety or depression, think about how much better your life could be if you didn’t have to spend so much energy managing those things.

Imagine how many possibilities there would be for your life.

Use that as motivation to leave your worry behind and to start to step past the awkward stage.

If you’re feeling particularly nervous about a session write down what is on your mind.

Having some discussion points written down can help you feel more prepared for the session and ease some of your worries.

 

going to therapy for the first time

 

Put Yourself Out There

You get out of therapy what you put in. If you aren’t ready or willing to open up and work through some of your stuff then you aren’t going to get the results you want.

Healing can be scary but you are worth it.

It’s OK if it takes time for you to trust your therapist, but if you aren’t willing to open up, you probably aren’t going to get the results you want.

For therapy to be effective you have to be committed to healing even if it’s uncomfortable.

Be sure to communicate to your therapist why you want to try therapy and what you would like to get out of it.

They should be able to work with you to help you set some goals for therapy that you can work on.

Call Them

After you find a therapist you’re interested in seeing call and talk to them on the phone.

Ask where they went to school, how long they have been practicing, and what theoretical framework they use.

Tell them what you want to work on (anxiety, depression, confidence, etc) and ask how they would approach it.

Talk to them about rates, insurance, and sliding scales. If you can’t afford what they are charging ask for a referral.

Notice how you feel talking to them. If you’re able to work out a rate you can afford and you feel like they might be able to help you, schedule an appointment.

There’s Nothing to Lose

If you’re thinking about going to therapy, I urge you to try it.

Maybe it won’t be for you but you won’t know unless you try.

Isn’t it worth it to see if you can find a therapist to help you feel better?

Your life is too short to stay miserable and/or in pain.

I found therapy to be effective but I tried and am still trying lots of different things to manage my depression.

You have to try different things to find what works for you.

If you are unhappy find some way to take action and eventually you will find something that will help you.

I’ve been to countless therapists, read tons of self-help books and tried about every health and fitness routine imaginable.

It’s taken me a long time to find a combination of things that really keep my depression manageable but the relief I have been able to find has made it so worth it.

Be Proud of Yourself

Many people will suffer their whole lives instead of going to therapy or finding a way to manage their mental health.

You’re asking for help and that makes you a total badass.

Make sure you are giving yourself the credit you deserve for doing something outside of your comfort zone in order to make your life better.

I wasted years of my life suffering instead of going to talk to a therapist and getting the medication I needed to manage my mental health.

I thought going to talk to a therapist would mean I was weak and I should just figure things out on my own.

Living with depression and anxiety is extremely difficult and there is no reason you shouldn’t take advantage of all the resources you can.

Going to therapy for the first time can be freaking awkward but wouldn’t you rather be a little uncomfortable to be able to talk to a professional that can help you with what you’re struggling with?

I was terrified of going to therapy for the first time but looking back I’m not sure why it was so intimidating.

Going to therapy gets easier the more you can and the first couple times are definitely the hardest.

I hope this article encourages you to kick your fear in the ass and go talk to someone. I have a lot of other articles about living with depression you can find here.

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Tips on going to therapy to manage depression and anxiety

Everything To Know About Going To Therapy

I am not a licensed therapist or mental health professional. If you are suffering from a major disorder and need treatment please seek the help of a professional. If you need help finding a mental health care provider call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or visit BetterHelp to talk to a certified therapist online at an affordable price. This post contains affiliate links, you can read my full disclosure policy here.

Radical Transformation Project.com is committed to providing information on mental health and personal development, but is not written by a health care professional. All material provided at radicaltransformationproject.com is for informational purposes only, and is not to be taken as medical advice or recommendation. Any health concern or condition should be addressed by a doctor or other appropriate health care professional. The information and opinions found on this website are written based on the best data available at the time of writing, and are believed to be accurate according to the best discernment of the author. Those who do not seek council from the appropriate health care authority assume the liability of any harm which may occur. The publisher of this site is not responsible for any errors or omissions in any content herein. Radical Transformation Project is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

Comments

  1. Harper Campbell says

    I am considering going to therapy, but am curious to know how to make sure that I am able to get the most out of this situation. I like how you elaborated that one thing that I need to make sure of is that I am actually putting myself out there. It is helpful that you stated that I only get out what I put into it, which for me will be hard for me to do but I am willing to try.

  2. Kenneth Gladman says

    I like that you mentioned how important it is to be open and honest throughout the process. It may not come all at once but it is important that once you are comfortable you share details. This is the only way you are going to get the results you want.

  3. Alexandria Martinez says

    The other day, my cousin was talking to me about getting mental health counseling. She was asking for my opinion on what I thought about getting this type of help. I think it is a great idea and I will let her know to give them a call and talk to them.

  4. Hannah Schroeder says

    I appreciate what you said about committing to therapy for six months in order to give it a fair shot. My mother suggested I see a psychologist for my eating disorder, but I’m not sure if it will help. When I find someone I like, I’ll have to commit to it in order to see if the therapy helps me in the long run.

  5. Ridley Fitzgerald says

    Thanks for the great tips for finding a therapist. I like how you said that your relationship with them is unique because it really is. My brother is looking for one now for his depression, and I’ll tell him to choose carefully.

  6. Bobby Saint says

    I appreciate you sharing some tips for going to therapy for the first time such as making sure that you find a therapist whom you can have a good working relationship with. It is important that you are comfortable speaking with your therapist and that you are able to freely express what you feel. You may also want to seek advice from your therapist on what type of approach or style is best to address your issues. One of these approaches is Cognitive therapy, which primarily addresses your mental health. If I were to undergo psychological therapy, I would make sure to keep this in mind. Thanks.

  7. Jay says

    Thanks for that brief explanation of the behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic approaches to psychology and therapy. I didn’t know about this! Is there any other types of methodologies out there that therapists use?

  8. Sutton Turner says

    I like how you said you may have to try different therapists until you find one that fits with you. I just started looking into therapy. Thanks for the tips for going to a therapist for the first time.

  9. Sutton Turner says

    I like how you said that going to a therapist is a significant investment of your time and money. I have been looking into getting individual counseling. Thank you for the tips on going to the therapist.

  10. Gary Puntman says

    It’s good to know that it might take a few times for you to find the right therapist for you. You want someone you can build a good relationship with. Not all therapists will be the same, so you need the right fit for you.

  11. Silas Knight says

    Thanks for the advice for finding a therapist. I like how you said that that relationship is unique. I’m thinking of getting some help for my depression, so I’ll try to find a good therapist.

  12. Sutton Turner says

    I am glad you said that it might take a few times to find the right person for you. I have wanted to go to family counseling for a while now. Thanks for the tips on picking a therapist.

  13. Marcus Coons says

    I loved when you mentioned how a therapist can help you develop coping skills. I understand that checking with your insurance can also help you find the type of therapists that knows how to treat what you have. My sister has started to sink in depression after her last break up, so I wanted to help her find the best pro.

  14. Marcus Coons says

    Thanks for talking about therapy. It is important to know what you want help with. Having a therapist that knows how to help you would be ideal.

  15. Shayla Cademis says

    Thanks for the suggestion to visit several therapists to figure out what works for you. My niece has experienced some rough times in her life, so I’m trying to figure out how to best help her in terms of counseling and education. Hopefully I can find great programs that will help her work through various issues and goals.

  16. Dennis Sanchez says

    I appreciate the tip about being giving yourself time when trying to deal with anxiety. I have been dealing with some bad anxiety in the past month. It would probably be a good idea for me to find a counselor to work with that can help me identify some of my triggers.

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